Saturday, October 6, 2018

4 Writing Method ( How-To Articles )






Writing Method that will get your article read.


But First lets talks about some writing myth that needs to be busted.

One common element whenever human beings gather is the need to talk and share experiences. Often that need turns into something a little more fun, a little more dangerous — gossip. 


Gossip is often fun but it can also be dangerous because it spreads quickly (because it is fun) and often distorts or even completely avoids the truth. Gossip creates myths in many fields and professions, and the field of writing is especially prone.

The top five myths about writing are:





Myth 1: Writing is easy for some people. Let me tell you that is just about the biggest myth going. I have been a professional writer for going on three decades now. I also know many other professional writers of various ages, experience, and income. 

I don’t know a writer that will tell you that writing is easy. Writing is brutal, hard work and there are times when I think it would be easier to simply open a vein as Red Smith said. However, experience and practice can make many writing tasks easier. There are some writing tasks that I can almost accomplish on autopilot because I have written that specific format and/or topic a lot.

Myth 2: Writing requires talent. I won’t lie. Talent can certainly help and talent is what separates the great writers from the good writers. But the truth is that talent is not enough to make a writer great or even good and talent is not a necessary requirement to be a good writer. 


Writing is a skill that can be learned, developed and honed. If you practice your craft if you read the writing of others to learn more about your craft, and if you seek and accept guidance and suggestions about your writing then you will improve and grow as a writer. Dedication harnessed with talent can create amazing results but if I had to pick just one then I would go with dedication. You can always increase your skill level through dedication.


Myth 3: Writing isn’t a useful skill. I have made my living as a writer for my entire professional life but even if you don’t intend to make your living with words you will need this crucial skill. There simply isn’t a profession that does not involve writing. Perhaps the form will vary, but written communication is the cornerstone in every professional field. 

Your writing ability will often impact landing a job as well as advancing in your career. Today written communication is even more crucial in professional and personal relationships.

Myth 4: You can’t make a living as a writer. I can remember when I told my father that I wanted to be an English major in college. He was very worried that I wouldn’t be able to support myself. 
The truth is that I have never had trouble finding a job and today I own my own business because of this flexible and important skill. Not only can you make a living as a writer but writing is an essential tool for many other careers and professions.

Myth 5: Writer's block is alive and torturing writers as you read this. I’m not dismissing the difficulties inherent in dealing with writer's block but whenever I talk with writers purportedly suffering from it they fall within two general groups. 

The first group actually creates their own block by insisting on the perfect place, mood, or alignment of planets in order to write. This is beyond ridiculous. One of the many benefits I gained from years of newsroom experience is the ability to write in almost any condition or mood. 
Deadlines will teach anyone how to give writer's block short shrift. The second group I have more sympathy for as their problem really is internal in nature. Usually, the problem is that the particular story (whether fiction or nonfiction) they want to tell is not yet finished cooking in their brain. 
In this case, while the writing may be stalled I don’t agree that it is blocked. The writer must listen to that inner voice and respond appropriately. Sometimes the idea needs more time to percolate and sometimes more research and/or planning is necessary. Once the proper adjustments are made the writing will begin to flow again.







So Now, how to write the article that will get read.


Creating short, how-to articles allows you to:

– connect with your audience


– position yourself as an expert, and


– increase sales


Bottom line: Give clients the information they need and you’ll be the first person they’ll think of when they run into challenges.


Consider creating a template for your e-mail newsletter articles that will fit the needs of your audience. Ask yourself if they want detailed information, or if they’re happy receiving broad ideas that will allow them to tailor the information to meet their specific needs.


If they want specific info, you could always include a teaser paragraph in your newsletter and then provide a link at the bottom of that paragraph. 

The link can lead to more detailed information about the subject your that audience is interested in.


Once you understand the needs of your audience, place your information in article format. Here’s a system I’ve often used to produce quick, informative articles.

1. Begin with an identifier paragraph.


This is an introduction to the subject. Just let people know exactly what you’re getting at.


2. Tell them why they should be interested.


This is where you just get into the reader’s world. You will what you’re talking about help them do their jobs better? In essence, that’s all people really want to know.


3. Give short, realistic pieces of advice.


You have so much to say it’s hard to fit it into short bits of info, but do it you must. Otherwise, you’ll lose your audience’s attention. Try to stick to the points that have the most impact or the ones that are completely opposite to what people in your industry are currently doing.


4. Wrap it up.


One of my mentors used to always say to me, “Tell ’em what you’re going to tell ’em. Then tell ’em. Then tell ’em what you told ’em.” No, he wasn’t senile. His advice actually worked. 

At the end of every article, I just wrap up what I’ve said by reviewing the key points of the article. It’s called a “takeaway.” What’s the one thing you want the audience to take away from your article and implement in their daily work lives? Once you’ve answered that question, you have your final paragraph.

Whatever you do, keep it short and simple. Sure we may want to use sophisticated language if your audience craves that, but you’d be surprised. 

When reading e-mail especially, readers won’t mind short, concise words and phrases. And that’s especially true if those words and phrases add more to the bottom line and/or help them become more efficient.




In Conclusion :


Writing article doesn`t need to be complicated, get to the point to share your experience with the world and get positive feedback.






Sylvain 
owner of
makemoneyblogging.ca
blogpostdir.com


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